Winter Auto Transport

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Regardless of whether you are wrapped up around a bonfire, or sufficiently fortunate to be in an atmosphere where shorts are a worthy type of dress this time of year, you should realize that not all seasons are made equivalent according to a trucker. In view of that, how about we investigate the customs of transportation amid the winter season, and how completing a smidgen of additional prep work will spare you a considerable measure of pain.

For those of you up North, you know when you ought to and shouldn’t drive in the icier months. A few snowflakes? Don’t sweat it. Ice tempest or blizzard? Better pack up because we aren’t going anyplace today. While snow is extraordinary for skiing or building snowmen, autos don’t do so well on the icy roads. Presently envision that rather than your 3000 pound prius, you are driving a ten ton truck with another ten tons in trailer and load pushing from behind.

With all of this in mind, here are the general rules of thumb if you are planning a car transport this winter season.

Truckers don’t care for driving in the colder atmospheres

You may think internally, “Isn’t that their activity? To drive?” While the response to this inquiry may be yes, you likewise need to consider that the greater part of truckers are owner operators. This implies they get the chance to pick where they drive, how they drive, and when they drive. Realizing that driving up North this season can prompt serious deferrals and terrible street conditions, you can envision that a large portion of them will stick to sunnier atmospheres.

What this implies for you is straightforward. There are less trucker’s driving in or out of the northern states, so any vehicles going to or from the North will keep running into a low supply of truckers and consequently higher wait times to get on a truck, and possibly at a higher cost. It’s not difficult to get your vehicle transported from Chicago to New York, yet it’s certainly going to take somewhat more time.

Check the climate

Look forward along the most plausible course for your trucker and see what sort of climate is in store for him in route. If you are shipping from San Francisco to Chicago, and there will be a blizzard in Denver two days after you auto is picked up? You might need to reconsider your planning on this one. The most ideal situation is that your auto gets picked up on time, yet the trucker gets deferred for 3 or 4 days since they can’t drive through the deep snow.

Your vehicle will get dirty

Once more, those of you that know about cold atmospheres are likewise acquainted with the street conditions. This incorporates the greater part of that salt that gets spread around to keep your auto from sliding into the closest solidified lake. While we aren’t discussing 3 months of buildup on salt from driving on the streets consistently, there is nothing the trucker can do on an open trailer to keep the majority of that street slush from getting on your auto. While it shouldn’t harm the paint or anything of that nature on more current autos, your vehicle won’t be splendid and glossy when it gets to you.

On the off chance that you are shipping a classic auto or a new auto that you truly would prefer not to be messy when you get your hands on it, we firmly propose investigating our enclosed auto transport choices around this season.

The sunny side of things

The winter months aren’t awful for everybody. On the off chance that you are shipping your auto along a southern course, cheer! You are in for smooth cruising and the most minimal rates of the year. The truckers that aren’t driving up North need to go some place, and that some place is typically the hotter atmospheres down South.

Don’t let transporting your beautiful car be another stressful item in a long list of things you need to get done. Give us a call and let us show you why we have a Peace of Mind Guarantee. No matter where you are going, we will make sure your car gets there safe and sound.

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